dotfiles vo 0.1

my dotfiles repo

Project maintained by sennychu Hosted on GitHub Pages — Theme by mattgraham

SennyChu’s dotfiles


Using Git and the bootstrap script

You can clone the repository wherever you want. (I like to keep it in ~/Projects/dotfiles, with ~/dotfiles as a symlink.) The bootstrapper script will pull in the latest version and copy the files to your home folder.

git clone && cd dotfiles && source

To update, cd into your local dotfiles repository and then:


Alternatively, to update while avoiding the confirmation prompt:

set -- -f; source

Git-free install

To install these dotfiles without Git:

cd; curl -#L | tar -xzv --strip-components 1 --exclude={,}

To update later on, just run that command again.

Specify the $PATH

If ~/.path exists, it will be sourced along with the other files, before any feature testing (such as detecting which version of ls is being used) takes place.

Here’s an example ~/.path file that adds ~/utils to the $PATH:

export PATH="$HOME/utils:$PATH"

Add custom commands without creating a new fork

If ~/.extra exists, it will be sourced along with the other files. You can use this to add a few custom commands without the need to fork this entire repository, or to add commands you don’t want to commit to a public repository.

My ~/.extra looks something like this:

# Git credentials
# Not in the repository, to prevent people from accidentally committing under my name
git config --global "$GIT_AUTHOR_NAME"
git config --global "$GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL"

You could also use ~/.extra to override settings, functions and aliases from my dotfiles repository. It’s probably better to fork this repository instead, though.

Sensible OS X defaults

When setting up a new Mac, you may want to set some sensible OS X defaults:


Install Homebrew formulae

When setting up a new Mac, you may want to install some common Homebrew formulae (after installing Homebrew, of course):



Suggestions/improvements welcome!


Thanks to…